Know how to optimize the technology in your practice

Brad Sutton, OD, FAAO, FORS, associate professor at Marshall B. Ketchum University, speaks Optometry Times®’ Kassi Jackson on highlights of his discussion titled “Retinal imaging grand rounds” that he co-presented during the 2022 American Academy of Optometry (AAOpt) Annual Meeting in San Diego.

Editor’s Note: This transcript has been edited for clarity.

Jackson:

Hello everybody. I’m Kassi Jackson from Optometry Times, and today I’m joined by Dr. Brad Sutton, clinical professor at the Indiana University School of Optometry and chief of service at the Indianapolis Eye Care Center, to me. dr Sutton is here to share highlights from his discussion titled “Retinal imaging grand rounds,” which he is co-presenting at this year’s American Academy of Optometry 2022 meeting in San Diego. dr Sutton, tell us about the lecture.

Suton:

Hey thanks for inviting me, I appreciate the opportunity. Yes, my colleagues here at IU – Dr. Larissa Krenk and Dr. Anna Bedwell – and I will be covering all types of different imaging of the retina and how we are using these imaging modalities to better serve our patients in the clinic. We’re going to talk about OCT, OCTA, a little bit about fluorescein angiography and fundus autofluorescence, so we’re going to cover many of the major different types of imaging that we use to better serve our patients both diagnostically and therapeutically.

Jackson:

Why is it important to discuss this as an optometrist?

Suton:

Yes, I think it’s really important that when we have a machine in our office, we know best how to use that machine. And we know what it can do for us, we know what conditions it is very helpful to analyze, track or monitor; It is always important that we get the most out of this technology so that we can provide the highest level of care to our patients.

Jackson:

Yes. And what does this understanding mean for patient care?

Suton:

Yes, really. I mean it does a lot to help us put patients in the box they are in, right. And so we’re getting the diagnosis better, you know, faster, we’re getting the diagnosis more accurate, if we can use this technology to say, okay, yeah, these two or three conditions might look similar, but because of the fundus autofluorescence shows here because of what the Okta shows here. I know that it is this condition, not this condition, that is allowed, so that we can take better care of the patients from the start.

Jackson:

And what is the take-home message that you and your co-hosts hope people will take away from the talk?

Suton:

I think the most important message to take away will be: if you have these tools and are using them in the clinic, make sure you use them as best you can. Make sure you know as much as possible about what they’re capable of so you can use them to better serve your patients’ needs.

Jackson:

Wonderful. well dr Sutton, thank you for your time today.

Suton:

Any time. Many Thanks.

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