The representatives of the election committee call for technical upgrades

A handful of New York boroughs had some trouble reporting election results as polling stations closed Tuesday night. The delay in results prompts a call for updated voting technology.

Monroe is one of the counties that experienced delays in reporting results on election night.

For the first time statewide, mail-in ballots and Election Day declarations were uploaded to the system at the same time.

It’s still unclear if this played a role in the system’s temporary pause in reporting the numbers in Monroe County.


what you need to know

  • Board of Elections officials call for technology upgrades
  • The New York State Board of Elections says it is in the process of certifying potential election systems submitted by three vendors
  • When these voting systems are certified, each borough in New York can vote for whichever is most appropriate for its area

While an investigation is ongoing to look into the matter, early indications are that it’s a connection bandwidth issue.

But both election commissioners say voting equipment and software are outdated, and they are urging the state elections agency to approve new and more up-to-date voting technology.

“Every device we use, whether it’s a voter registration system, an electronic system, our voting machines, our login ballot pads and our tally pads, anything that tabulates, anything that touches a ballot, or a voter has to be certified by the New York State Board of Elections so unfortunately we’re here waiting for them to certify new ballot readers, new voting machines and a new electronic voter database,” said Lisa Nicolay, commissioner of the Monroe County Republican Electoral Commission.

The New York State Board of Elections says it is in the process of certifying potential election systems submitted by three vendors. This includes ES&S Express Vote, a modernized system that offers numerous on-site checks and balances. The Hart Intercivic Verity is a ballot scanning and tabulating device. It is most commonly used to support polling stations with voters hand-marking paper ballots. And ImageCast X, which allows all voting channels and results tables to be done from a single, unified database.

Once these voting systems are certified, each county in New York State can vote for whichever is most appropriate for its area.

How long could certification take? A spokesman for the state election committee says months, even up to two years. The machines are currently being tested in the laboratory.

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